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Poster: cowboyth24 Date: Feb 9, 2011 12:26am
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: So who's your favorite Enlightenment era philosipher? (non-dead)

I find myself becoming a big Diderot fan. The guy invented the Encyclopedia, and Kant's a little too wishy-washy for me. Just thinking out loud.

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Poster: roughyed Date: Feb 9, 2011 1:00am
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: So who's your favorite Enlightenment era philosipher? (non-dead)

Immanuel Kant was a real pissant
Who was very rarely stable.
Heidegger, Heidegger was a boozy beggar
Who could think you under the table.
David Hume could out-consume
Wilhelm Freidrich Hegel,
And Wittgenstein was a beery swine
Who was just as schloshed as Schlegel.

There's nothing Nietzsche couldn't teach ya'
'Bout the raising of the wrist.
SOCRATES, HIMSELF, WAS PERMANENTLY PISSED...

John Stuart Mill, of his own free will,
On half a pint of shandy was particularly ill.
Plato, they say, could stick it away;
Half a crate of whiskey every day.
Aristotle, Aristotle was a bugger for the bottle,
Hobbes was fond of his dram,
And Rene Descartes was a drunken fart: "I drink, therefore I am"
Yes, Socrates, himself, is particularly missed;
A lovely little thinker but a bugger when he's pissed!

(just drinking out loud...)

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Poster: cowboyth24 Date: Feb 9, 2011 1:36am
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: So who's your favorite Enlightenment era philosipher? (non-dead)

Funny, last nights homework.

To acquire an initial introduction to Kant's definition of a philosope, one doesn't need to go beyond the first paragraph of his essay, What is Enlightenment?, wherein he states, "Have courage to use your own reason" (Kramnick,1). Delving further into Kant's essay it seems apparent that he holds most of his animosity towards the church rather than those with political power when it comes to the suppression of reasonable thought. This comes across in his statement that, "I have placed the main point of the enlightenment -the escape of men from their self-incurred tutelage chiefly in matters of religion because our rulers have no interest in playing the guardian with respect to the arts and sciences and also because religous incompetence is not only the most harmful but also the most degrading of all"(6). Finally, in an interesting statement Kant argues that those with less civil freedom actually are at a greater advantadge to further the process of reason. This is evidenced in the closing statement where he opines that' "...A lower degree of civil freedom, on the contrary, provides the mind with room for each man to extend himself to his full capacity"(7).
Diderot's view on philosope, though similar, seems to be more concerned on the acquisition of knowledge for the purpose of being passed on to future generations. He also differs from Kant in that the majority of blame seems to be placed on political leaders. When speaking of the government Diderot states, "These people do not realize that they occupy but a single point on our globe and that they will endure only a moment in its existence"(19).
Dumarsais seems to concentrate on the need for deep internal thought and not making rash decisions based on bias. "...Here you have the great perfection of the philosoper: when he has no reason by which to judge, he knows how to live in suspension of judgement"(22).

And a little Neil Young to boot.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=V5vkDShl00I&;NR=1

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Poster: boltman Date: Feb 9, 2011 8:39am
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: So who's your favorite Enlightenment era philosipher? (non-dead)

"I am, therefore I think" is putting Descarte before de horse.

Sorry...only enlightenment philosopher joke I know.

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Poster: bluedevil Date: Feb 9, 2011 9:25am
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: So who's your favorite Enlightenment era philosipher? (non-dead)

Told this one before:

The Dalai Lama and Descartes went to a ballgame. "His Holiness" ordered a hot dog and asked Descarte, "do you care for one?" Descarte responded: "I think not" and promptly vanished.

Hey, I didn't say it was funny.

I found Marie Antoinette to have a good head on her shoulders - for a period of time.

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Poster: roughyed Date: Feb 9, 2011 1:52pm
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: So who's your favorite Enlightenment era philosipher? (non-dead)

Not a joke as such, but the pronunciation of female genitalia in London might sum up Kant's philosophy.

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Poster: William Tell Date: Feb 9, 2011 9:37am
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: So who's your favorite Enlightenment era philosipher? (non-dead)

I shud smash a cake in your face for that...

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Poster: Skobud Date: Feb 9, 2011 5:47am
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: So who's your favorite Enlightenment era philosipher? (non-dead)

Hume of course....It even kinda relates here...Check out his essay, "Of Miracles" which is a great perspective on Miracles. He would tell you that miracles are divine, and none of us are godlike enough to recognize one even if we saw it. Im not a religous guy, just a philosophy minor.

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Poster: Dudley Dead Date: Feb 9, 2011 7:39am
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: So who's your favorite Enlightenment era philosipher? (non-dead)

I will be obvious, and vote for Voltaire . Not so much for his philosophy, but the fact that "Candide", and his other fictive writtings are so much fun !

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Poster: Mandojammer Date: Feb 9, 2011 6:48am
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Buzzkiller

A little before the Age of Enlightenment but Publilius Syrus has been my go to guy as I ponder the impending economic and energy dislocation coming in the next decade.

"Tis foolish to fear what cannot be avoided."

I love it when a problem solves itself regardless of what we have to say about it, what political capital is attempted to be made, what furrowed brow hand-wringing we are subjected to by Keith Olbermann, "that dude" Rachel Maddow or any of the other glossy-lipped bimboes on CNN, Fox, etc., or what horseshit government program that gets created to deal with it.

Okay, I'm done...........and back.

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Poster: hasher Date: Feb 9, 2011 2:52am
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: So who's your favorite Enlightenment era philosipher? (non-dead)

Since he hasn't been mentioned I'll say Bertrand Russel. He's no Epictetus but he beats the hell out of Rick Warren.

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Poster: waynecs Date: Feb 9, 2011 4:58am
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: So who's your favorite Enlightenment era philosipher? (non-dead)

This calls for a top 10 list.